During our Chiang Mai trip, we decided to join a small group day tour to Doi Inthanon National Park through Klook. It was a convenient option for our little family because the package already included hotel transfers and lunch. 

About Doi Inthanon National Park

Doi Inthanon is fondly called the roof of Thailand. It rests on a part of Himalayan mountain range at 800 to 2,565 meters above sea level. Doi Inthanon is one of the top national parks in Thailand, housing waterfalls, trails, and villages that accommodate many nature-inclined activities. “Doi” means mountain. 

Visit Wachirathan Waterfall

Family pictures at wachirithan waterfall
Family pictures at Wachirithan waterfall

Although the stop at Wachirathan waterfall was brief, I consider it the cherry on top of our trip. It was satisfying to watch and hear the crashing waters from 40 meters up, especially with the twin rainbows on display. 

Rainbow at the foot of a waterfall
The double rainbow was a treat.
Family trip to wachirithan waterfall
Lesson learned: wear a waterproof jacket before heading to a waterfall.

Doi Inthanon Mountain, the highest peak in Thailand.

Family trip to Doi Inthanon Mountain
The tour has a walking trail, but do wear shoes and comfy clothes that allow much movement.

The entire national park is named after King Inthawichayanon, the last king of Chiang Mai. He was known to be an active voice calling for conserving the northern forests. After his death, he willed to rest at Doi Luang, so the mountain was renamed Doi Inthanon. 

Klook tour guide explaining about Doi Inthanon
Our tour guide walked us through the history of Doi Inthanon

Our tour guide gave us a quick overview of Doi Inthanon and taught us that “Doi” means mountain. 

The Twin Chedis/Pagodas

The twin pagodas, Phra Mahathat Naphamethanidon and Nophamethanidon, were built in honor of King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Queen Sirikit’s 60th birthdays in 1987 and 1992. It offers tourists a great view of the area, being on top of the main summit of Doi Inthanon.

The twin pagodas or twin chedis in doi inthanon park at chiang mai thailand
Left most chedi: Nohphamethanidon for Queen Sirikit, Right most: Phra Mahathat Napamethanidon

We spent a good thirty minutes here, which was perfect for stretching our legs after more than an hour in the van, and for us parents with children, an opportunity to spend the pent-up energies of our kids. 

Family trip to the twin pagodas in Doi Inthanon National Park
The Twin Pagodas are touristy, equipped with escalators and whatnot. But it offers a great view of the national park.

Shopping at Thai Hmong Community Market and Thai Lunch

We had our lunch at an open-air place reminiscent of a food court, next to a few souvenir shops offering dried fruits, nuts, plants, delicacies, traditional Thai clothes, and more. 

Finds at the Hmong market

Our son enjoyed the free taste from the vendors, and we bought some dried strawberries. We wish we had bought more because they were delicious! We like how they preserved the natural taste of the strawberries and that they’re not overly sweet as some preserved fruits would be. 

They were generous with the free tastes.

We also bought a Thai costume for our son as a souvenir and for his Friday uniform in school. I got a pretty kimono-style top with a similar print.

Nice souvenir and gift ideas from the Hmong market
Nice souvenir and gift ideas from the Hmong market

We had a basic Thai lunch, including Tom Kha Gai (chicken in a tangy coconut soup), stir-fried vegetables, cashew chicken, fried chicken, mounds of rice, and platters of pineapple and watermelon slices. 

Lunch at Thai Hmong Community market
Our lunch

Karen Hill Tribe Village

The Mae Klang Luang Village is a famous scene in Chiang Mai with rice paddies on the mountain slopes. 

The rice paddies
The rice paddies

The village is home to the Karen hill tribe, the largest ethnic minority group in Thailand. They hailed from Tibet, moved south to Myanmar, and eventually settled in Northern Thailand. 

Karen Hill Tribe weavers
Karen Hill Tribe weavers

There are many Karen tribes in Thailand, and we met some from the “white” Karen tribe for their white-colored woven dresses for singles. They can wear colored clothes after marriage. 

The tribe does most of the work as a community. Weavers can display their work in the shop and leave them there until they’re sold. Payments will be made at the end of each day. 

Pati Non Coffee Roasting Plant

Rustic outdoor cafe at Pati Non Coffee Roasting Plant
Rustic outdoor cafe at Pati Non Coffee Roasting Plant

We concluded our visit to the tribe with an afternoon of coffee and tea-tasting at Pati Non Coffee Roasting Plant. It’s a simple, outdoor coffee roasting place and cafe that serves unlimited coffee for its guests. The community plants, harvests, and roasts the coffee beans for sale. 

Coffee tasting at Pati Non Coffee Roasting plant Chiang Mai
It was a straightforward coffee tasting. The locals brewed the leaf tea, cascara (coffee husk tea) and their coffee as we arrived and we were free to get as much as we can.
cute cups for coffee tasting
We had cute cups!

They also offer natural scented soy candles, coffee beans, cigarettes, and natural insect repellents, and natural pain reliever ointments.

goodies from pati non coffee roaster
They have coffee, cigarettes, and dried banana chips (we think?)
Souvenirs from Pati Non Coffee Roaster
Their all natural scented candles and pain relievers would be a great gift!

Sirithan Waterfalls

The view deck at Sirithan Waterfalls
Sirithan Waterfalls

Our short look-see at the Sirithan waterfalls was a nice close to our trip to Doi Inthanon National Park. We stayed at the viewing deck for a few minutes, taking in the fresh, cool air and admiring the waterfalls in full blast. 

Get this tour package for your Chiang Mai Trip!

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